Exhibitions

February 25 - September 18, 2011

INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART

"That Mr. Dial is a self-taught, fearless, ambitious African-American from the South is fascinating. His experience clearly informs what he does, but like the steepest slopes in the Tour de France bicycle race, his work is 'beyond category.' The only label required by his formidable collage-constructions is that of first-rate, powerful Art—with a capital 'A.' —The Wall Street Journal

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

September 25, 2005 - January 8, 2006

 

"Tour-de-force paintings so feral in their wrath, so exuberant in their invention, so monumental, playful, profound, and technically proficient….the sheer tumultuous force of his mammoth multimedia works make the more conventional traditions look timid in comparison…" —Newsday

 

Andrew Edlin Gallery presents Thornton Dial: Viewpoint of the Foundry Man, on view from November 10 – December 29, 2012. The exhibition features approximately fifteen of the artist’s renowned mixed media assemblages, created over the last 3 years. An exhibition catalogue is available and features “Coming Back Clear,” an essay by Karen Wilkin along with a preface by Phillip March Jones.

Andrew Edlin Gallery
134 Tenth Avenue
New York, NY 10011

www.edlingallery.com

FRIST CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, NASHVILLE

May 25 - September 2, 2012

 

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

September 6 – November 10, 2002

WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

November 11, 2002  - March 9, 2003

 

“Some of the most miraculous works of art America has produced…. So eye-poppingly gorgeous that it’s hard to know how to begin to account for them.” –New York Times

 

MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART, SANTA FE, NM

November 16, 2007 – May 11, 2008

 

Gee’s Bend is a small rural community nestled into a curve in the Alabama River southwest of Selma, Alabama. Founded in antebellum times, it was the site of cotton plantations, primarily the lands of Joseph Gee and his relative Mark Pettway, who bought the Gee estate in 1850. After the Civil War, the freed slaves took the name Pettway, became tenant farmers for the Pettway family, and founded an all-black community nearly isolated from the surrounding world.

 

ACKLAND ART MUSEUM, UNC, CHAPEL HILL

March 30 – July 1, 2012

 

While most recognized for his large scale, multi-media assemblages, Thornton Dial’s drawings are his most prolific body of work, spanning from the early 1990s into the present. Organized by the Ackland Art Museum, Thornton Dial: Thoughts on Paper will feature 50 of Dial’s earliest drawings from 1990-1991, a pivotal moment in his artistic career.

 

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

June 4 – September 4, 2006

 

“…The women of Gee’s Bend are unanimously agreed to have shattered artistic boundaries. Their bold, vibrant designs are as radically different from orthodox quilt patterns as Picasso was from anyone who preceded him.”—The Times of London

 

1996 CENTENNIAL OLYMPIC GAMES, ATLANTA, GA

 

Presented as part of the Centennial Olympic Games in Atlanta, Souls Grown Deep: African-American Vernacular Art of the South was a major survey of African-American self-taught art, containing more than 300 art works by over 40 contemporary African-American artists of the Southeast.

Writing in Newsweek, critic Malcolm Jones, Jr. reviewed the cultural events presented in conjunction with the Atlanta Olympic Games:

Saturday, January 25, 2014 to Sunday, May 18, 2014

ASHEVILLE ART MUSEUM